Sunless Tanning in St Paul, Minnesota

A natural tan may look great, but the Sun’s UV rays are harmful for your skin. Sunless tanning products and professional spray-tans are a safer way to get tanned looking skin without the risks of sun exposure. Sunless tanning products contain the color additive dihydroxyacetone (DHA) which temporarily dyes the outer-most layer of your skin. At-home products usually last 3-5 days, and professional spray-tans can last about a week before they start to fade.  

How sunless tanning is performed

At-home sunless tanning products can come in different forms like lotions, gels, creams, or sprays. The specific application directions vary by product. Common steps include exfoliating your skin in the shower by gently scrubbing with a washcloth, drying your skin well, and applying the product evenly, area-by-area.

Professional spray-tans are a great option if you’re unsure about your ability with at-home products. Just as with sunless tanning products, you should shower, exfoliate, and dry your skin thoroughly beforehand. At the tanning facility you will be methodically sprayed with a sunless tanning product. It’s important to note that the active ingredient DHA is unsafe to breathe in, and it should be kept off of mucous membranes such as the lips, nose, and eye area. Your tanning facility will give you protective goggles, lip balm, and nose plugs.

Results

Your specific results will vary since there are so many different types of sunless tanning products with different chemical formulations and application methods. A common complaint with at-home products is streakiness and uneven color, but professional spray-tans usually deliver higher-quality and more natural looking results. Sunless tanning products fade due to your skin’s natural regeneration process. You can expect results to last about 3-5 days for at-home products, and about a week for a professional spray-tan.

Before & After Photos

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